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Measuring the Value of PR Requires Looking at Outcome, Not Output

Measuring the Value of PR Requires Looking at Outcome, Not Output

When my husband and I recently bought a new car, we began our search not by wandering from dealership to dealership, but by conducting several hours of research at home. We read dozens of reviews and recommendations, paying particular attention to those that examined the features and safety ratings important to us. We were just as interested in reading case studies about why buyers selected their cars as much as were in the experts’ reviews. We searched industry publications like Consumer Reports and Car and Driver, consumer and car enthusiasts’ blogs, and social media platforms like Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube. By the time we walked into the dealership, we had basically already made up our minds. The salesperson merely helped to validate our choice.

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Run for the Hills

When was the last time you watched a movie about a crisis or disaster? Given the popularity of the genre, it probably hasn’t been long. I’ve noticed that when disaster strikes, screen writers take one of two approaches: Everyone runs for the hills or they come out guns blazing.

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Using Surveys to Create Relevance

I’ve observed that many companies struggle with up-leveling their PR programs beyond product-focused campaigns. Back in 2002 Symantec struggled with that same issue and I proposed what was then a novel idea: A survey that would measure consumers’ experience with spam as well as their general and specific concerns about receiving unsolicited e-mail. The goal was simple. Symantec’s Norton Internet Security included Norton Spam Alert and we wanted to generate issues-based coverage.

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